Sauteed Collard Greens

Sauteed Collard Greens PinSauteed Collard Greens are a new addition to our rotation. In fact, we just ate them for the first time a few weeks ago and fell in love with them! They’re hearty, delicious and extremely nutritious!

Collard greens are another cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, beet greens, broccoli, cauliflower, kale and others. They have numerous health benefits and you should be eating some everyday to for your intestinal tract and overall well-being.

This recipe has a little kick thanks to the red pepper flakes. They’re so flavorful you won’t be able to get enough of them, especially since they cook down. Similar to Beet Greens, they’re a little too bitter to eat without cooking unless you have a super-duper, eat anything green, vegan palette.

If you like this recipe, you might also like our Sauteed Kale, Beet Greens or Boiled Cabbage.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Boiled Cabbage

Boiled Cabbage PinThis Boiled Cabbage recipe is super simple and highly nutritious. Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable in the same family as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, collard greens, Swiss chard and others.

Numerous studies have shown how important these types of cruciferous vegetables are to our intestinal tract and overall health. They’re so good for us, we should be eating them everyday and this easy recipe will help you do that.

Dr. Michael Greger’s book, “How Not To Die,” goes into great detail about the value of cruciferous vegetables, as well as the benefits of eating a whole-food plant-based diet.

We prefer to eat our Boiled Cabbage with a little red wine vinegar and pepper, but you can top it with salsa, Grandpa’s Dipping Hot Sauce, lemon juice, turmeric, cayenne pepper or your other favorite toppings.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Vegan Creamed Spinach

Vegan Creamed Spinach PinThis Vegan Creamed Spinach is easy to prepare and absolutely delicious. A great side-dish on its own or a tasty base for your Vegan Sardou.

Spinach is loaded with iron and other healthy nutrients, but it can get tiresome eating it raw all the time. This is a nice alternative that’ll help you add more greens to your daily routine.

This recipe makes about 2 servings and doesn’t reheat well so you’ll want to finish it in one sitting. If you’re cooking for one, just cut the ingredients in half or double them if you’re cooking for four.

Vegan Creamed Spinach Instructional Video

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Roasted Artichoke Hearts

Roasted Artichoke Hearts PinThese Roasted Artichoke Hearts make a great side dish or a nice addition to your side salad. Perfect for your Vegan Sardou with Vegan Creamed Spinach, Easy Tofu Scramble and Vegan Hollandaise.

Artichokes are a member of the thistle family and the edible portions are actually the buds before they go to bloom. I always thought they looked like a weed, and they kinda are. But very tasty none-the-less.

This recipe literally takes only a couple minutes to prepare and it’s a great source of deliciousness without the calories. This recipe makes 2 servings (half a can per serving), but only has 42 calories.

Be sure to get the artichokes packed in water or your calories from oil will shoot through the roof!

Roasted Artichoke Hearts Instructional Video

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Sauteed Kale

Sauteed Kale PinEnjoy this delicious and nutritious Sauteed Kale as a side dish with your favorite main dish or bowl of soup.

Kale tops the list of superfoods because it’s loaded with antioxidants, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and a good amount of Protein. It helps fight and prevent some forms of cancer, and it even promotes urinary tract health [source].

Sautéing the kale softens it up and removes the bitterness that some people don’t like. Personally, I could eat kale everyday, sautéed or not. And I don’t like bitter foods. When prepared correctly, it tastes great and your body will thank you for feeding it all that nutrition.

Try mixing up your kale recipes by using Dinosaur Kale or Red Kale when it’s available.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Sweet Quinoa Salad with Oranges, Dates, Beets & Pomegranate

Sweet Quinoa SaladThis Sweet Quinoa Salad with Oranges, Dates, Beets and Pomegranate lives up to it’s name. It’s very sweet with the natural sugars from the fruit and beets, but the quinoa loads it up with 8 grams of protein per serving.

Amelia and I love colorful dishes, and they don’t get much more colorful than this one! It’s great as a side salad with your Vegan Black Bean Burgers or as a stand-alone lunch dish.

If you take this to work for lunch, your co-workers are guaranteed to take notice! They’ll wonder what the crazy vegan is eating now with a subconscious feeling that they’re missing out! Print out the recipe and take it with you so you can just hand it to them without saying a word!

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Chopped Asian Salad with Orange Sesame Dressing

Chopped Asian SaladThis delicious Chopped Asian Salad recipe is a hearty, colorful, tangy and delicious asian salad with 7 grams of fiber, 11 grams of protein and your whole days’ worth of Vitamins A and C.

Asian salads are known for their unique combination of sweet and savory. Some even throw in some spiciness for good measure. This recipe has it all.

The orange and agave provide the sweet. The veggies and soy sauce provide the savory. And the ginger and Sriracha give it a spicy kick that will make your tongue impatient for the next bite of this delicious Chopped Asian Salad with Orange Sesame Dressing.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Hearts of Palm Salad

Hearts of Palm SaladThis is a delicious, hearty Hearts of Palm Salad with lots of colorful variety and nutrients. With 8 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber and only 218 calories, it makes an excellent side salad for your dinner. You can also make it a main lunch dish by adding some black beans or garbanzo beans for some extra calories and protein.

Hearts of Palm is a new and welcome addition to my diet. I had heard of them before, but never tried them. They’re mild with a similar taste and soft texture as artichoke hearts, but they’re shaped like water chestnuts. They’re delicious on nearly any salad.

We used JP’s Italian Salad Dressing, but you can use your favorite vegan salad dressing.

To reduce the calories and fat, you can skip the avocado.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Broccoli Salad

Broccoli Salad PinThis Oil-Free Broccoli Salad is one of Amelia’s all-time favorites and now it’s one of mine too. It certainly fits Amelia’s fresh and delicious requirements, but it’s also nutritious. It has 4 grams of fiber, 4 grams of protein and 161% of your RDA of Vitamin C.

Broccoli is considered by many to be a superfood. A controversial term, I know, but if there is such a thing, broccoli would be it. According to Dr. Greger, “Broccoli can be considered a dark green leafy vegetable, and may help lower the risk of mouth throat, lung, breast, ovarian, endometrial, cervical, and prostate cancers. Raw broccoli specifically may also help bladder cancer survival. Broccoli may even protect against DNA damage, affect gene expression, and boost liver function.”

Broccoli is best consumed raw or lightly steamed to maximize the nutrient value. We like to lightly steam the broccoli because we don’t like it as much raw. Plus, steaming brings out the bright green chlorophyll colors!

This cruciferous vegetable is also loaded with sulforaphane, which is an important phytonutrient that has been shown to help prevent and fight several forms of cancer. However, the sulforaphane appears to be deactivated by cooking unless you chop the broccoli into small pieces about 40 minutes before cooking.

Broccoli Salad

That requires a little extra planning, but it’s not difficult. You can chop the broccoli during your fruit and veggie prep and store it in the fridge until you’re ready to make it, or just chop it up about 40 minutes or so before you want to start cooking and leave it on the cutting board until you’re ready.

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, kale, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts are potent immunity boosting and cancer fighting foods so it’s a good idea to consume a least some of them every day. We put kale in our Easy Garden Salad, and broccoli would be a nice addition to that recipe, too.

If you have a discerning eye, you may notice that we used walnuts instead of pecans for our photos. We prefer pecans in this recipe, but we haven’t been able to find any here in Ecuador. Plus, walnuts are very affordable here compared to most other nuts, so we eat them far more often. Feel free to use your favorite unsalted, raw or dry-roasted nuts in this recipe.

We love this Broccoli Salad on a hot summer day with fresh broccoli and tomatoes, but it’s good all year round. We generally eat it as a side dish with something like a Vegan Lentil Burger, but it’s great as a lunch meal with a slice of bread or a small bowl of White Bean Soup followed up with some fresh fruit.

Broccoli Salad Cooking Video

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If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Herbed Tomatoes

Herbed TomatoesMy mom made these Italian herbed tomatoes for me as a kid and I loved them! This was one of the first veggie dishes I ate. It has a lot of flavor and she peeled the tomato skins off, which my childhood palette really appreciated. As an adult, the skins don’t bother me and they pack a lot of extra phytonutrients so leave them on if you want to.

Mom made these with lots of olive oil, but now that we have a much better understanding of how oil harms our arteries, I changed the recipe to omit it. That will change the flavor a bit, but your heart will thank you.

You can serve these tomatoes as a standalone side dish or serve them over your leafy green salad as a delicious dressing.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.