Date Walnut Vinaigrette Salad Dressing (Oil Free)

Date Walnut Vinaigrette PinThis oil-free Date Walnut Vinaigrette Salad Dressing recipe is rich and delicious! Most vinaigrettes have oil, but since we’re oil-free plant-based eaters, we used walnuts as the (truly) healthy fat. The dates give it a little sweetness and the balsamic gives it a little tanginess.

Many of the phytonutrients in dark leafy greens and other vegetables are fat soluble, which means you need some healthy fats in your digestive tract at the same time as the veggies to allow your body to extract the most nutrients.

A lot of people still think oil is a healthy fat, but it comes with a lot of extra baggage and lacks all the fiber and many of the beneficial nutrients that come in the whole-food form. Oil is essentially a refined fat that may have some healthy ingredients, but it’s packaged along with several unhealthy ones. It’s far healthier to get your healthy fats from whole foods like nuts, seeds and avocados instead of processed foods like oil.

Date Walnut Vinaigrette

Using 3/4 cup of water in this recipe yields a pretty creamy salad dressing. You can make it even thicker by cutting back to 1/2 cup water, or you can thin it out by using a full cup. It really depends on your own personal preferences.

You can put this delicious Date Walnut Vinaigrette dressing on most of your favorite salads, including our Easy Garden Salad, Spinach Salad or Hearty Side Salad.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.
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Fennel Orange Salad with Beets

Fennel Orange Salad PinThis Fennel Orange Salad with Beets is one of Amelia’s fresh and delicious specialties. She loves to make this cold salad for us on a hot summer day.

Fennel is one of my favorite veggies. It smells like liquorice but it’s a vegetable! How is that even possible! Combined with the orange and beets, this salad smells and tastes like candy!

It’s great all by itself, but it’s even better served over arugula or your favorite leafy greens.

The beets are a nice addition and lend more sweetness to the salad. They take about 45 minutes to boil and need to cool for 10 to 15 minutes before you can peel them so keep that in mind when you’re planning your meal time.

Remember to zest the orange before you peel it. That’s a lot easier than trying to zest a peel.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Balsamic Marinated Baked Tofu

Balsamic Marinated Baked Tofu PinThis Balsamic Marinated Baked Tofu recipe is easy and fast to prepare. It pairs well with Healthy Butternut Squash, Boiled PotatoesBeet Greens, Sauteed Kale, a Side Salad or your favorite side dish.

Soy, and tofu in particular, have been attacked by the dairy industry for over a decade. When they noticed soy milk cutting into their cow’s milk profits, they funded a bogus “scientific” study and launched a smear campaign against soy.

Even though the study has been thoroughly debunked and soy has been proven to be healthy for us, the soy myth is still perpetuated by the uniformed, especially in the paleo and Adkins diet communities.

One of the most outlandish claims is that the phytoestrogens in soy will give men breasts. Plants do have phytoestrogen, but plant estrogen is completely different than animal estrogen. Unlike the animal estrogen in cow’s milk, phytoestrogen doesn’t have any affect on the human body.

Cow estrogen, however, does affect the human body. According to a 2015 study, “it seems that steroid hormones are very potent compounds in dairy foods, which exert profound biological effects in animals and humans.” As for cow estrogen hormones specifically, they have been shown to be responsible for “initiating and provoking of breast and prostate cancers.”

Regions of Asia have been consuming soy and tofu for thousands of years and they have some of the world’s longest life expectancies. Unless you have a soy allergy, you’re probably safe to consume it as part of a healthy, balanced plant-based diet.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Vegan Polenta with Mushrooms and Lentils

Vegan Polenta PinThis Vegan Polenta with Mushrooms and Lentils recipe is colorful, delicious and filling. The sweetness of the polenta combines nicely with the savory mushrooms and tangy balsamic reduction. It’s a party for your taste buds!

While it tastes great, it’s very low calorie so one serving doesn’t make a meal. It has 7 grams of fiber and 8 grams of protein, but only 104 calories per serving. That means you’ll need to eat two servings, or pair it with something else like Oven Roasted Red Potatoes and a Side Salad.

This recipe makes 12 servings. You can cut the ingredients in half to avoid having too many leftovers.

If you have leftover polenta, it makes a great breakfast topped with some fruit preserves and served with a slice of whole grain toast with cashew butter.

Vegan Polenta with Mushrooms and Lentils Instructional Video

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Vegan Portobello Mushroom Steaks w/ Balsamic

Vegan Portobello Mushroom Steaks PinYou won’t believe it until you try it, but these Vegan Portobello Mushroom Steaks have the flavor and texture of a high quality filet mignon without the cholesterol and cruelty. The balsamic flavor combined with the mushroom texture are sure to trick your senses.

Portobello mushrooms are a great vegan substitute for those hot summer days when you want to grill out. We baked these in the oven, but there’s nothing stopping you from throwing them on the grill to get that extra charred flavoring.

You can also put these on a bun with some lettuce and tomato and eat them like they’re a juicy steak burger. I’ve had these in restaurants and they’re delicious!

We originally made this with 2 tbsp of olive oil instead of 1/4 cup vegetable broth, but we try to go oil-free as much as possible now so we’ve updated this recipe. We think it tastes just as good.

Olive oil is a processed food and 100% fat with 120 calories per tablespoon. Removing the oil from this recipe took the calories per serving from 93 to 34. That means almost 2/3 of the calories in this recipe came from the oil! Holy cow! Skip the oil. You won’t miss it.

This pairs exceptionally well with our Sautéed Spaghetti Squash with Kale and Tomato and some Oven Roasted Red Potatoes.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Balsamic Salad Dressing

Balsamic Salad DressingThis Balsamic Salad Dressing recipe is Amelia’s favorite salad dressing. It’s simple to make and very tasty. The agave gives it a little sweetness and the garlic…well, it’s garlic. You can’t go wrong with garlic.

Balsamic vinegar has a delicious, savory flavor. Amelia prefers white balsamic and I prefer it dark, but both are very flavorful. Sometimes we just put plain balsamic vinegar on our salads, especially if we’re trying to reduce our oil intake.

This balsamic salad dressing will go well on our Hearts of Palm Salad or any side salad. It only takes a couple minutes to throw together with ingredients found in most kitchens.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Chickpea Kale Salad Sauté

Chickpea Kale Salad PinThis is a delicious Chickpea Kale Salad oil-free recipe that can serve as a main dish or a side dish. It’s also good warm or as a cold leftover.

It’s packed with nutrition, containing 10 grams of fiber, 15 grams of protein, 359% RDV of Vitamin A, 245% Vitamin C and 26% Iron. Eat this dish for lunch and you’ve hit much of your daily nutrient requirements.

It’s packed with nutrients, but 1 serving only has about 220 calories so if you want it to be a one dish meal, you may want to eat 2 servings. It pairs well with Oven Roasted Red Potatoes to give it a little more volume.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Balsamic Roasted Brussels SproutsI hated Brussels sprouts for the first 41 years of my life. Then I met Amelia and she made these Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts. Boy was I missing out. These are easy to make and a delicious source of amazing nutrients.

Even if you think you hate Brussels sprouts, if you like balsamic vinegar on leafy greens, then give these a try with an open mind. They’re not the frozen brick of sprouts your mother microwaved, then doused the soggy green balls with white vinegar. These Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts fresh from the oven are delicious.

Brussels sprouts are a good source of fiber, protein and vitamin C. With only 121 calories for about 1 cup, these are filling, nutritious and can help with your weight loss goals.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant-based eating.

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