Cranberry Oatmeal with Green Apples

Cranberry OatmealThis Cranberry Oatmeal with Green Apples recipe is both sweet and tart. With 7 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein but only 215 calories, it’s also a filling and nutritious breakfast.

We like to use green Granny Smith apples in sweet recipes to add some tartness. If you have a sensitive palette or don’t like your breakfast dishes to be tart, try using regular red Gala apples and let us know how it turns out.

Don’t use instant oats for this, or really any recipe. All of the nutrients have been processed out, which is why they cook so quickly. Steel cut oats are the best. They’re chewier and more filling. Regular rolled oats are the next best, but they don’t stick to your ribs for nearly as long.

Amelia doesn’t have a sweet tooth like I do so she left out the brown sugar. It was way too tart for me (and probably the rest of humanity) so I added a tablespoon of brown sugar to mine. That sweetened it up just enough to balance the tartness.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Vegan Overnight Oats

Vegan Overnight Oats PinThis raw vegan overnight oats recipe is fast and easy to make, and it works great for busy morning schedules. The hardest part is remembering to prepare it the night before!

Oats are a nutritious way to start your day. According to Dr. Greger, “Oats contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant phytonutrients that can help prevent buildup in the arteries and maintain arterial function. The fiber in oatmeal binds to cholesterol, resulting in lower blood cholesterol levels. In fact, just one serving a day of oats or barley may lower cholesterol.”

Oatmeal is also great for your weight loss goals! “The soluble fiber of oatmeal forms a gel in the stomach, delaying stomach emptying. The oatmeal fiber makes people feel full for a longer period, helping with weight loss. In a double-blinded randomized trial of overweight and obese men and women, almost 90% of the oatmeal-treated subjects reduced their body weight compared to the control group that had no weight loss.”

We like vegan overnight oats because it’s a hearty breakfast that you don’t have to cook in the morning. This recipe makes enough for 4 servings so for us, we can eat it on two different mornings. I don’t recommend keeping it more than two days, though, so you’ll need to finish it quickly.

If you love oats like we do, you might also enjoy our raw Rolled Oats Breakfast recipe.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.

Steel Cut Oats Recipe

Steel Cut Oats Recipe PinThis Steel Cut Oats Recipe is a staple breakfast for us. It’s filling and easy to prepare, with lots of healthy nutrients. While they’re almost nutritionally equal, steel cut oats fill us up more than Cooked Rolled Oats and seem to stick with us longer.

Chia Seeds and Flax Seeds are considered by many to be super-foods because of their nutritional density. They have lots of fiber and protein, and they’re also a great source of omega-3s, which are important for us plant-based eaters to get since we don’t eat fish.

The peanut butter thickens up the oats and adds more protein while the fats slow the absorption of the carbs helping to control blood sugar spikes, which can lead to hunger once your blood sugar crashes a few hours later. With the spices and fruit, this makes a delicious and nutritious breakfast.

If you have a sweet tooth, you can add more sweetener. We used stevia because that’s easy to find here in Ecuador while other natural sweeteners are either hard to find or very expensive. Feel free to use your favorite sweetener, or skip it entirely.

Steel Cut Oats RecipeWe suggest consuming some calcium fortified non-dairy milk every day to help ensure you’re getting enough calcium in your diet, especially if you’re a vegan. Some studies show that vegans who consume less than 525 mg of calcium per day suffer increased fracture rates compared to non-vegans and vegans who consume more than 525 mg of calcium per day.

For most brands, 8 ounces (1 cup) of calcium fortified non-dairy milk contains more than 400 mg of calcium so that puts you almost there for the day. You can easily make up the rest of your calcium needs with whole plant foods like kale, broccoli, brussels sprouts, beans, potatoes, etc. All plants have some calcium, but not all is easily absorbable so you just need to eat more of them to get your calcium needs met if you don’t want to drink fortified non-dairy milk.

If you make this recipe, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. And please share with your friends to help spread the word about healthy plant based eating.